Two-Year Legal Saga Of Chinese Cyber Hack Of U.S. Military Aircraft May Be Ending.

On 28 June 2014, a Chinese businessman based in Canada was arrested on the charge of stealing information about a raft of U.S. military aircraft and weapon systems. This particular case of industrial espionage was described by the U.S. Justice Department as being “unusual for the tremendous amounts of data that is involved.” According to e-mails that were obtained by the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), “tremendous amounts” came to more than 65 gigabytes over one specifically identified two-year period and involved “dozens of U.S. military projects.”

The businessman in question, Su Bin, finally agreed a plea deal with the U.S. government in March of this year in which he admitted using his company, Lode Technology, to steal data in U.S. military aircraft and weapons programs for years. Court documents also detail how he then collaborated with contacts inside of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) to sell this information to various Chinese military aircraft R&D and production centers.

The data is reported to have been stolen from different computer systems included detailed information on the Boeing C-17 Globemaster cargo lifter and two jet fighter programs for which Lockheed Martin is the prime contractor—the F-22A Raptor and F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF).

Source: Cyber Warfare Episode Plays Out in Court Case | Defense News: Aviation International News

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This week, the 28 member states of the North Atlantic Treaty Oganization will meet in Warsaw, Poland, to discuss the future of the world’s largest military alliance. At the Warsaw Summit, NATO is expected to classify cyperspace as “Operational Territory,” making the online and digital property of member states equivalent to their geographic territory. In other words, if a foreign state messes with a NATO country’s computers, it might as well have just rolled a tank over their border. While NATO’s proclamation shows that the battlefield of the future is changing rapidly, it also proves that no one is completely sure how to conduct cyberwarfare yet.

“When I read this [proclamation], I read it like the Nigerian constitution being hard on corruption — it’s aspirational. It’s not in and of itself something that will lead to a huge outcome of change,” Josef Ansorge, author of Identify & Sort, a book which examines the role of information technology in international relations, tells Inverse.

NATO’s operates as a “collective defense” organization. Under Article Five of the official treaty, an attack on any member nation constitutes an attack on the whole alliance, who will respond in kind. The new rule technically means a cyber attack on any NATO member state would also trigger Article 5, but Ansorge says digital attacks often aren’t as clear cut as physical violence, nor is retaliating to them. Ansorge says the digital battlefield raises three crucial conundrums to world leaders: how to legally classify digital attacks, establish the perpetrators of the attack, and how to respond proportionally. In short, cyberwarfare gets very complicated, very quickly.

Source: 3 Cyberwarfare Issues NATO Should Address at the Warsaw Summit | Inverse

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The two tech giants have stepped up their fight using the same technology used to remove videos with copyrighted content.

Silicon Valley has long struggled with how to police inappropriate or even criminal content. Earlier this year, Microsoft, Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter agreed to work with the European Union to identify and combat hate speech online. The problem these companies face is that they often rely on users submitting and flagging material, but the concern is that if companies start taking down users’ posts themselves, they run the risk of being seen as self-censoring. Now, though, at least two tech companies have turned to automation to remove extremist content from their platforms.

YouTube and Facebook are among a group of tech giants that have quietly begun to use automation to eradicate videos featuring violent extremism from their Web sites, Reuters reports. Two sources tell the news outlet that the technology the companies are utilizing is the same used to automatically identify and delete copyright-protected content, though it’s unclear how much of the process is automated. (Google, Facebook, and others are already using automation to eliminate child pornography on their platforms.) The companies’ end goal is not to identify new extremist videos posted to their platforms, but to prevent re-posted material that’s already been deemed inappropriate from spreading, including Islamic State videos. Neither YouTube’s parent company Google nor Facebook would confirm the reports, nor will they discuss the use of such automation publicly, Reuters’ sources say, partially out of concern that terror groups will learn to circumvent the technology.

Source: Google and Facebook Quietly Escalate Their Cyber-War on ISIS | Vanity Fair

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Walls defended cities for millennia against attacks from invading armies. Their worth was proven time and again. It was safer for the defendant to stay locked indoors, with food and water in stock, and weather it out till the resources of the attacker were depleted. Siege warfare was won by patience and a strategy of attrition; as well as by sound wall engineering and smart allocation of defending resources. From the fourth century till the beginning of Renaissance the glorious city of Constantinople was defended successfully against waves upon waves of foreign invasions from all directions thanks to one of the finest and strongest walls ever built. But on 29th May 1453 the Walls of Constantinople came tumbling down, and along with them came the crushing end of the Eastern Roman Empire. The Ottoman conquerors had destroyed the city walls using a newly invented technology: the cannon.

Source: The Walls of Constantinople and the new era of cyberwarfare

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North Korea’s patterns of cyberattack could be evolving, Seoul’s police agency said Wednesday.

North Korean hackers have mainly used viruses to gain access to South Korean computers, turning individual PCs into “zombies” that could then be used to conduct distributed denial-of-service, or DDoS attacks.

But investigations in Seoul revealed North Korean hackers could increasingly be engaging in “psychological warfare” through the seizure of information on individual computers, South Korean newspaper Herald Business reported.

Source: North Korea engaging in psychological cyber warfare against South

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