Why Privacy Is Actually Thriving Online

Privacy is dead—or so we’re told, both by those who would mourn the loss and by those who would dance on its grave. And the murderers aren’t just the NSA and snooping corporations. We too have played a part in privacy’s demise, through our embrace of mass exhibitionism. When hands are raised at a concert, they’re holding cameras, ready to shoot and post to an ever-expanding array of social networks. When we cook a delicious meal, the thumbs type a tweet before the mouth gets a bite. “OK, Glass” summons a machine worn on the face to capture video, audio, and geographic location and then broadcast it to the world. With so many private moments now public, the reasoning goes, we must no longer value privacy.

But a human life is not a database, nor is privacy the mere act of keeping data about ourselves hidden. In reality, privacy operates not like a door that’s kept either open or closed but like a fan dance, a seductive game of reveal and conceal.

By that standard, the explosion of personal information online is giving rise to new mysteries, new unknowns. When you post a photo on Instagram, it offers up not just answers but hints at new questions: Who were you with and why? What were you feeling? What happened between the updates, and why was it left out? Secrets, creative concealments, the spaces between posts—this is where privacy flourishes today.

via Why Privacy Is Actually Thriving Online | Threat Level | WIRED.

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Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare | www.jlcw.org The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare provides a public peer-reviewed law publication to foster open discussion and education of technology, government and legal stakeholder in relation to the complex issue of cyber warfare.  Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare accepts articles written by military, technology, judges, government officials, academic and legal practitioners.  The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare provides a public peer-reviewed law publication to foster open discussion and education of technology, government and legal stakeholder in relation to the complex issue of cyber warfare.  Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare accepts articles written by military, technology, judges, government officials, academic and legal practitioners. The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare is honored by the world class caliber editorial board that is involved with the Journal. Thought leaders from forensics, law, warfare, and cyber security are on the Board. The Journal is always looking for interested thought leaders who believe they can contribute in a meaningful fashion to the development of cyber warfare scholarship.

Author: Daniel Garrie

Daniel Garrie is a renowned computer forensics, e-discovery, privacy, and cyber security expert and thought leader. Quoted in Forbes and profiled in the Los Angeles Daily Journal, he is a frequently retained neutral and Chair of Alternative Resolution Center’s (ARC) E-Discovery and Forensic Dispute Resolution practice. Today, Mr. Garrie is a Partner and General Counsel for Law and Forensics LLC, a boutique legal strategy and forensics firm that works with clients across industries to address privacy, e-discovery and forensic issues in the U.S. and abroad.In the past two years, Mr. Garrie has been involved in over 50 e-discovery matters both in the U.S. and abroad.