“Weev” Prosecutor Admits: I Don’t Understand What the Hacker’s Co-Conspirator Did

Lawyers for hacker and Internet troll Andrew “weev” Auernheimer appeared in federal appellate court in Philadelphia on Wednesday morning before a packed house to contest Auernheimer’s November 2012 conviction for conspiracy to hack under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).

Auernheimer is currently serving a 41-month prison sentence (and has been in solitary confinement most days) for a breach of AT&T’s servers by his co-conspirator, Daniel Spitler, that revealed 114,000 e-mail addresses of iPad users. Auernheimer then passed along the e-mail addresses to Gawker, which thereafter published the information in redacted form. Auernheimer was convicted of a felony under the CFAA for conspiracy to access AT&T’s servers against the company’s will.

Assistant US Attorney Glenn Moramarco, counsel for the government, argued that Auernheimer’s CFAA conviction should be upheld:

We have a case here where…[the defense counsel] is arguing that this was completely open to everyone. But you look at the testimony of Daniel Spitler and the steps he had to take to get to this wide open Web and I’m flabbergasted that this could be called anything other than a hack. He had to download the entire iOS system on his computer. He had to decrypt it. He had to do all sorts of things—I don’t even understand what they are.

via “Weev” prosecutor admits: I don’t understand what the hacker’s co-conspirator did | Ars Technica.

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