It Turns Out People Are Better At Protecting Their Privacy Than Companies Would Like

The struggle between Facebook, Google and their users has led to an unexpected result, contends a new book on privacy: Every time social networks force openness on their users, people become much more guarded in what they share, leading internet giants to push for yet more openness. This is the argument made by three academic researchers, Antonio Casilli, Yasaman Sarabi, and Paola Tubaro, in their new book, “Against the hypothesis of the end of privacy.“

The researchers find that the end of privacy is only one of the possible results of the way online behaviour is evolving, and not the mostly likely one. At the heart of their argument is that users aren’t inert. Far from accepting a steady, linear erosion of their privacy, users of social networks react to changes by over-protecting their privacy. Every time a network tries to make itself more open, its users—in aggregate if not individually—respond by closing themselves off even more. It is a constant tussle. The authors call these “cycles of privacy.”

via It turns out people are better at protecting their privacy than companies would like – Quartz.

———————————————-

Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare | www.jlcw.org The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare provides a public peer-reviewed law publication to foster open discussion and education of technology, government and legal stakeholder in relation to the complex issue of cyber warfare.  Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare accepts articles written by military, technology, judges, government officials, academic and legal practitioners.  The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare provides a public peer-reviewed law publication to foster open discussion and education of technology, government and legal stakeholder in relation to the complex issue of cyber warfare.  Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare accepts articles written by military, technology, judges, government officials, academic and legal practitioners. The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare is honored by the world class caliber editorial board that is involved with the Journal. Thought leaders from forensics, law, warfare, and cyber security are on the Board. The Journal is always looking for interested thought leaders who believe they can contribute in a meaningful fashion to the development of cyber warfare scholarship.