This cyber-security start-up is trying to get corporations to open up about their issues – The Washington Post

Trustar, a start-up headed by a former Bush Administration cyber-security advisor, announced Monday that it has raised $2 million from West Coast investors for a platform that allows companies to anonymously compare notes on cyber-threats.

Chief executive Paul Kurtz held senior positions on the Bush Administration’s National Security Council from late 1999 to 2004 and co-founder Dave Cullinane served as eBay’s chief information security officer for five and a half years.

The financial injection comes as several Washington-area start-ups are attracting investor interest. Tenable Network Security and Ironnet Cybersecurity, both based in Maryland, announced fund-raises of $250 million and $32.5 million respectively in the last few weeks.

Rather than try to spot hackers or keep them out, Trustar’s business hinges on getting companies to talk to one another.

“The problem is that every enterprise is getting hit and what they’re trying to do is secure themselves on an individual basis,” said Kurtz, “but at the end of the day they’re fighting a losing battle.”

Trustar’s system, which it calls “Connective Defense,” already has 12 Fortune-500 companies feeding information into the platform.

The young start-up has yet to charge clients, but the idea is that companies will use the service to share things like hackers’ IP addresses, which parts of the system are under attack, and how they’re being attacked, all in real time.

Source: This cyber-security start-up is trying to get corporations to open up about their issues – The Washington Post