Stop Glorifying Hackers

I WAS at the Museum of Modern Art in New York not long ago, soaking in Edward Hopper’s retro downer mystique, when I got a call that opened up brave new all-night-diners of doom and gloom.

The editor of thesmokinggun.com, a website that publishes embarrassing documents with headlines like “Man Jailed for Toilet Seat Attack on Disabled Kin,” had come into some documents of mine, including my Social Security number with birth date, a photograph of me assailing a moth infestation in an elderly friend’s kitchen and nearly all my passwords.

The conduit of the purloined goods was Guccifer, a hacker made famous last year for liberating George W. Bush’s post-presidential self-portraits from his sister’s email. Colin Powell’s Facebook page was also defaced, but plenty of people with no state secrets got caught in his net (apparently he got to me while hacking the email of my friend Sidney Blumenthal, the Clinton family consigliere).

Yet in January, when Romanian authorities arrested Marcel Lazar Lehel, the 40-something citizen thought to be Guccifer, the world did not seem to share my relief. Instead of being called out as the Grim Reaper of privacy, Mr. Lehel got mostly attaboys. Guccifer is “to hacking what the Beatles are to rock and roll,” wrote New York magazine. A commenter on Gawker suggested a legal defense fund.

via Stop Glorifying Hackers – NYTimes.com.

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Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare | www.jlcw.org The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare provides a public peer-reviewed law publication to foster open discussion and education of technology, government and legal stakeholder in relation to the complex issue of cyber warfare.  Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare accepts articles written by military, technology, judges, government officials, academic and legal practitioners.  The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare provides a public peer-reviewed law publication to foster open discussion and education of technology, government and legal stakeholder in relation to the complex issue of cyber warfare.  Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare accepts articles written by military, technology, judges, government officials, academic and legal practitioners. The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare is honored by the world class caliber editorial board that is involved with the Journal. Thought leaders from forensics, law, warfare, and cyber security are on the Board. The Journal is always looking for interested thought leaders who believe they can contribute in a meaningful fashion to the development of cyber warfare scholarship.