New Worm Infects Thousands of IoT Devices, Mines Cryptocurrency

A new type of malware, first discovered in November, is infecting Internet of Things, or IoT, devices in order to mine cryptocurrency, according to computer security company Symantec.

The worm, known as Linux.Darlloz, takes advantage of the tendency not to change access restrictions on IoT devices and routers from default factory user names and passwords. The latest variant of the malware can infiltrate 13 kinds of devices using default credentials and had infected 31,000 IP addresses in 139 regions at the end of February, says Symantec.

Once Darlloz has breached a system, it installs the open source cryptocurrency miner “cpuminer.” So far, the choice by the malware programmer to target home computers and devices has limited the scope of the processes carried out once a system is infected.

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“The worm appears to aim at mining Mincoins and Dogecoins, rather than focusing on the well-known and more valuable cryptocurrency Bitcoin,” Kaoru Hayashi, threat analyst with Symantec, explains in a blog. “The reason for this is Mincoin and Dogecoin use the scrypt algorithm, which can still mine successfully on home PCs whereas Bitcoin requires custom ASIC chips to be profitable.”

via New worm infects thousands of IoT devices, mines cryptocurrency, warns Symantec – FierceITSecurity.

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