Just the Right Amount of Cyber Fear

If our leaders don’t even use email, can we trust them to make decisions about our brave new e-world? In a book released a few days ago—Cybersecurity and Cyberwarfare: What Everyone Needs to Know—we are immediately struck by how unprepared we really are as a society:

As late as 2001, the Director of the FBI did not have a computer in his office, while the U.S. Secretary of Defense would have his assistant print out e-mails to him, write his response in pen, and then have the assistant type them back in. This sounds outlandish, except that a full decade later the Secretary of Homeland Security, in charge of protecting the nation from cyber threats, told us at a 2012 conference, “Don’t laugh, but I just don’t use e-mail at all” … And in 2013, Justice Elena Kagan revealed the same was true of eight out of nine of the United States Supreme Court justices, the very people who would ultimately decide what was legal or not in this space.

Scary. Or is this a strategic choice to opt out of technology, given online threats every day in the news?

via Just the Right Amount of Cyber Fear – Patrick Lin – The Atlantic.

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Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare | www.jlcw.org The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare provides a public peer-reviewed law publication to foster open discussion and education of technology, government and legal stakeholder in relation to the complex issue of cyber warfare.  Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare accepts articles written by military, technology, judges, government officials, academic and legal practitioners.  The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare provides a public peer-reviewed law publication to foster open discussion and education of technology, government and legal stakeholder in relation to the complex issue of cyber warfare.  Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare accepts articles written by military, technology, judges, government officials, academic and legal practitioners. The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare is honored by the world class caliber editorial board that is involved with the Journal. Thought leaders from forensics, law, warfare, and cyber security are on the Board. The Journal is always looking for interested thought leaders who believe they can contribute in a meaningful fashion to the development of cyber warfare scholarship.