A Cybercrime Gang-Software Pirate Mash-Up

Cybercrime gangs are always looking for new revenue streams, so it should come as no surprise that they are using pirated software as yet another way to make money.

The explosion in bring-your-own devices coming to work every day has exposed enterprises to pirated and tainted software. A new report published today by IDC and the National University of Singapore found that organized crime is costing enterprises worldwide more than $315 billion a year, as they become more and more exposed to pirated software rigged with malware. The report projects that businesses worldwide will spend close to $500 billion this year to clean up and recover from pirated software infected with malware that makes its way into their organizations. Those costs break down to $127 billion for security issues and another $364 billion in costs of data breaches linked to the tainted software.

The study, which was commissioned by Microsoft, attributes two-thirds of those losses — $315 billion — to criminal organizations profiting from pirated, tainted software.

“It’s not surprising to me that there are a lot of losses” with pirated software, says John Gantz, senior vice president at IDC. “I’m surprised we [as an industry] didn’t realize before that criminal organizations would be there.”

via A Cybercrime Gang-Software Pirate Mash-Up — Dark Reading.

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