BYOD or CYOD – an International Divide Across the Pond?

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) inevitably made it onto all the ‘crystal balls at the ready’ 2014 predictions list from assorted analyst firms, research houses and headline hungry vendors.

One BYOD piece that did catch my eye came from identity management firm SailPoint’s 2013 Market Pulse survey, a study based on interviews with 400 IT decision makers at companies across the US and the UK with at least 5,000 employees and budgets of $606 million and £665 million respectively.

This year’s survey confirms mainstream enthusiasm for BYOD policies – 82% of respondents allowing employees to use their personal devices to access company data or applications at work – but lack of attention to the accompanying requirement for revised security thinking.

It’s a conclusion that inevitably plays to the SailPoint agenda – as you’d entirely reasonably expect from a vendor-sponsored survey – but nonetheless the top line findings are impressively depressing:

More than 50% of the respondents reckon to have experienced situations where terminated workers tried to access company data or applications after they left the organization.

57% had experienced the loss of company-owned devices containing sensitive information.

46% are not confident in their ability to grant or revoke employee access to applications across their full IT infrastructure.

51% believe that its ‘just a matter of time’ before another security breach occurs.

45% believe that employees within their organization would be prepared to sell company data if offered the right price.

So that’s BYOD for you!

via BYOD or CYOD – an international divide across the Pond?.

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