The 80-20 rule of cyber security

80 per cent of cyber attacks are opportunistic threats which can be tackled by cyber hygiene and best practices, according to Arnold Shimo, Chief Technologist, Innovation and Technology Centers at Lockheed Martin. The remaining 20 per cent, however, consists of Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs) – unknown, predetermined, intentional and well-equipped attacks that anti-viruses cannot mitigate. Opening their workshop at the FutureGov Summit 2013 with this insight, Shimo and Mahesh Kalva, CTO, International and Tech Transition at Lockheed Martin, raised awareness about a different type of cyber risk posed to government agencies and how their Cyber Kill Chain strategy could be used to counter it.

Drawing the participants’ attention to certain inadequacies of the The National Institute of Standards and Technology’s (NIST) incident handling process of APTs, Shimo laid out the seven stages of Lockheed Martin’s Cyber Kill Chain – a strategy designed to help defenders understand the actions, intentions, methods and tools of the attacker. The seven stages are Reconnaissance, Weaponisation, Delivery, Exploitation, Installation, Command & Control and Actions on Objectives. In this model, an attacker has to go through all seven stages to be successful while the defender succeeds by disrupting, degrading or denying access to the attacker anywhere in the chain.

via The 80-20 rule of cyber security | Articles | FutureGov – Transforming Government | Education | Healthcare.

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Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare | www.jlcw.org The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare provides a public peer-reviewed law publication to foster open discussion and education of technology, government and legal stakeholder in relation to the complex issue of cyber warfare.  Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare accepts articles written by military, technology, judges, government officials, academic and legal practitioners.  The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare provides a public peer-reviewed law publication to foster open discussion and education of technology, government and legal stakeholder in relation to the complex issue of cyber warfare.  Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare accepts articles written by military, technology, judges, government officials, academic and legal practitioners. The Journal of Law & Cyber Warfare is honored by the world class caliber editorial board that is involved with the Journal. Thought leaders from forensics, law, warfare, and cyber security are on the Board. The Journal is always looking for interested thought leaders who believe they can contribute in a meaningful fashion to the development of Cyber warfare scholarship.